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New Victory Blog

The New Victory Blog is a place to learn more about New York's theater for families and the shows we produce. Find out what we do and what we're passionate about—exploring the arts as a family.

The New Victory Theater launched the New Victory Usher Corps the day the theater opened in 1995 to provide paid employment, job training, academic support, mentorship and an introduction to the performing arts for over 50 young New Yorkers each year. Since then, the program has provided over 400,000 hours of paid employment to over 500 NYC teens from across the city. Find out how teens ages 16-21 in your life can apply to be a part of this award-winning program here!

All season long, we'll be featuring young people from the Usher Corps in our New Vic Bills and here on the New Victory blog. Today we're talking to third-year usher Nica Salcedo from Queens, New York.
 
 
NikaMy favorite show at The New Victory was…
Oh Boy! by Théâtre du Phare put me on a roller coaster ride of emotions. The audience was able to really feel a connection to the characters, even though there was only one man performing!
 
The show I'm most excited for this season is...
Velocity! When I watch tap dancing, I'm always blown away by their talent. I wish I could move my feet that fast.
 
The thing I like most about being an usher is…
Getting to interact with people of different backgrounds and ages.
 
My favorite memory from working as an usher was... 
Before a performance of Mother Africa: My Home, a girl named Kyra walked in to do the fabric-designing activity. We spoke until she needed to leave to find her seat, but when she came back at intermission, she gave me her finished product. It was a piece of fabric with hearts on each corner and both our names in the middle.
 
My dream job would be… 
To become a pageant coach so I could both teach and work in pageants. 
 
My love of theater started... 
In the first grade, when I was cast as the lead in my school play.
 
Who inspires you?
My sister, Alexandria. When we were growing up, she was my mother, father, sister and best friend all at once.
 
What is your favorite subject in school?
English because I like writing—especially free writing. I love getting to express all of my emotions on the page. 
 
What's your favorite thing to do when you're not at work?
I like to do photoshoots around the city—either as the model or as the photographer.
 
What's your favorite NYC hangout or neighborhood?
Jackson Heights because it's very diverse. Different blocks can offer you a totally different cultural experience, from Indian to Bengali, Filipino, Mexican, Peruvian, Tibetan, Nepali or Thai to name a few.
 
Describe your dream vacation.
Island hopping in the Philippines!

 
New Victory Thumb Want to learn more about The New Victory Theater Usher Program? Take a look here!

Photo: Alexis Buatti-Ramos
Posted by Beth Henderson

Traveling all the way over from the United Kingdom, New International Encounter (NIE), the team behind Beauty and the Beast, brings with them a wide array of theatrical and musical talent. The show is a devised piece of theater that reframes older versions of the fairytale with new elements such as live music (performed by the talented company), as well as a change from a story about a damsel in distress to one of female empowerment.
 

During the first production in 2017, Michael Judge, the Associate Director of NIE, asked the cast and creative team a few questions about the development of the ferociously funny retelling. Keep reading for a deeper look into the creation of Beauty and the Beast

Michael Judge: You started with an idea of the classic fairytale, but everything else—the songs, words and actions—the company invented. How did you go about that process?

Alex Byrne (Director): At first, we had a few days where we just met to develop some musical ideas. Then, we started to tell each other the story of Beauty and the Beast as we remembered it. We wrote down major plot points on big pieces of paper, and then tried to connect them in a simple way.

There are a lot of different stories to work from, but we chose to start with the fairytale fairytale. One night, we watched both the Disney movie and the Jean Cocteau black and white French movie together. I was very interested in the French setting of that movie, and realized that I wanted our version to take place in France too. It isn't really in the Disney version, but it is in some of the others—they come from Paris where it's posh and expensive, and they move into a poor, broken down cottage in the countryside. That's an interesting dichotomy—from luxury to ruin—especially because the story centers about what's on the outside of things versus what's on the inside.

Then, we asked each other, "What's the Beast's story? Where does the Beast come from? What did the Beast do to be cursed?"

Sara Lessore (Isabella): In terms of the process, Alex would give us a scene and we would just improvise it. When we liked something, we later incorporated it into the script. 

MJ: So, there was a lot of brainstorming, and then you cut out the rubbish bits and kept the good bits. 

AB: Exactly. We knew we wanted the Beast to invite Isabella to dinner, and I wanted it to be terrible. He has to get it all wrong, and for it to be quite beastly, despite his best attempts. Martin really went for it—sometimes in quite a scary way. It's nice when you go to the theater and see different things that don't normally happen. I think that's why this dinner party scene is so entertaining.
 
SL: There's a process about just saying, "Yes," isn't there? Our ensemble just has this thing about saying, "Yes," and accepting everything. So, if Alex asks us to do something, we just say, "Yes" and go with it. We put ourselves out there.

MJ: Elliot, can I ask you, as musical director, about how you created that music?
 
Elliot Davis (Anastasia and Musical Director): I consulted with Alex a lot, and when he said he wanted it to be set in France—immediately, I knew I wanted an accordian. You can say to an audience, "We are in France," but if you have music that sounds French, it transports them. As for the songs themselves, they emerged organically. 

Usually, we come up with about two, three or four bits of music to see what we can work with and what we can't. One day, Alex and I had some spare time, so we made the first song—the one about the Beast's story. It just came out of messing around with different pieces of music we already had.

We'd walk in the room with enough music to give everyone pieces to play. So, there were loads of arrangements that we didn't end up using. Just messing around is great for a brainstorm, plus getting together and playing music really helps a new cast bond. 

Everyone brought ideas, so when we got closer to the production, Alex and I would have to start saying, "Okay, stop doing that and start doing this." We began to find out what works. It's an ensemble piece, you bring everything to the table, and then you slowly start taking bits away.
 
MJ: Do you have any advice as to how to stay motivated during the creative process, even when it gets hard and you have doubts or worries? 
 

Martin Bonger (Beast): In making a show like this, you have to have fun. There were times when we were struggling, and then Alex would say, "Come on, we need to have a laugh." Or, we'd all come together and say, "We need to have fun—we have to be able to play together." Playing together is how you discover and create new things.
 
I think that something Alex is great at—is getting us to try new things. While we were creating this show, sometimes we would start discussing ways in which an idea might or might not work. Alex always said, "Oh no, no, let's just try it and see what clicks." Sometimes, what we tried, ended up being totally different. So, my advice would be to just try things out, because that's a really great way of finding out what material works. It's okay to be wrong–if you only try to get things right, you're stopping yourself before you can really start. 
 
Michael: It seems like you really look after each other as an ensemble. Alex, what initially inspired you to adapt Beauty and the Beast for the stage?
 
AB: The most important thing for an artist, is to work in good faith. In a way, you say, "I go to work, and I try to make something," and then you try to make it as best as you can and for the right reasons.

Beautiful and excellent bits of culture are essential for a full life—it confirms our humanity. With art, we can see that the questions we have about the world are shared—they're common. Art can celebrate difference and allow us to walk in someone else's shoes. Being a part of the theater audience experience can be really nourishing for children, and for adults. 

So, the reason why we made this show—and the reason that I first proposed it to our team—is because I wanted to make something beautiful and excellent. That was the only reason, and I had to let go of any other sort of motive that drove me, other than that. 
 
Lauren Extrom
Lauren Extrom is the Fall 2018 Communications Apprentice at the New Victory Theater. She is a second-year graduate student in the Performing Arts Administration program at NYU Steinhardt. In addition to her work as an arts administrator and aspiring arts educator, she is an active vocalist and musician in the New York City area.  She sings in the NYU Jazz Choir, and tours with VOICES 21C, a Boston-based non-profit chamber choir.  In her spare time, she practices yoga and improv dance.
Posted by Beth Henderson
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