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New Victory Blog

The New Victory Blog is a place to learn more about New York’s theater for families and the shows we produce. Find out what we do and what we’re passionate about—exploring the arts as a family.
October 5, 2015

History Brought to Life


A great many historical tales have been brought to life onstage, from the historical plays of Shakespeare to tales of folk history, like ROBIN HOOD! With that in mind, and in honor of World Teachers Day this week, we asked our staff to recall moments from their childhoods when history was brought to life in theatrical ways. Here are a few of their stories.
 
 
Christopher Ritz-Totten, in 7th grade and now   Christopher Ritz-Totten
Public Relations Associate

I remember quite vividly the way my 7th grade history teacher, Mr. Miller, spoke about historical figures, and the various ways he would engage our class with through interactive storytelling. He approached every lesson with a passion that I loved, but in the moment I wasn’t sure how to outwardly convey my appreciation. All I knew was that I was having fun while learning! In hindsight, I can say that Mr. Miller was one of the most influential teachers I ever had.

I distinctly remember the week that Mr. Miller prepared our class for a visit from Mary Todd Lincoln. He kept telling us that the late president’s wife would be coming in to tell us about her life as the First Lady. He was right. We were in class one day when all the lights went out. The door opened, and in walked a lady in period dress carrying a flickering lantern. I was captivated, hanging on her every word. She spoke about her life, Abraham Lincoln’s life, the world in which they lived and how it differed from the world as it is now. It was in that moment that I knew learning could truly be engaging. It is this memory that I often reference as being the inspiration for my love of theater, and perhaps my commitment to educational theater.
 
Courtney Boddie, in 5th grade and now   Courtney Boddie
Director of Education / School Engagement

When I was in 5th grade, Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty were undergoing a huge renovation. Our classes worked in small groups to research the history of them both. We also recycled bottles and cans for the 5¢ deposit for months to help fundraise for the renovation. The culmination of the project was a field trip to Liberty Island, where still under renovation the old torch lay on the ground! I recall taking a class picture in front of it. 

When we landed on the island, there were people there to escort us from the ferry to the pedestal of the statue. The peculiar thing was that they were speaking gibberish, or perhaps a language that just wasn't known to us. They physically moved us into different lines, examining us (somewhat respectfully) and seemingly asking us questions and expecting answers. But none of us understood. As they continued to switch my classmates between different lines, each student was given a card that was a specific color and had more gibberish written on it. Some kids were shepherded away, while those of us left behind were confused, even a little scared, and I remember being slightly angry!

Eventually, the other students returned, happy and with lollipops, but the rest of us were still confused! Then, for the first time, the leader spoke in English and said that we had just been led through a simulation of what it was like to enter Ellis Island. What we had just experienced was what many immigrants experienced when they first immigrated to this country in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. We proceeded to have a rich conversation about what we had been thinking and feeling during the activity, and we made meaningful connections to that part of history. 

I often think back to that experience I had as a 10-year-old and it never fails to amaze me that the adults who worked there were, in essence, teaching artists! They acted in roles, and placed me and my classmates in roles, to help us better understand and empathize with the people who had entered this country through Ellis Island. They will never know how much that specific experience has impacted me.
 
Zack Ramadan, in 8th grade and now   Zack Ramadan
Digital Content Producer

I fondly recall Mr. Switzler, my knit tie-wearing 8th grade social studies teacher, who encouraged us to perform original theatrical pieces set during post-Civil War Reconstruction. In small groups over the course of three weeks, we wrote and directed short plays that brought to life the conflict between freedmen and insurgent klansmen, and the relationships between sharecroppers and landowners. In addition to being a freeing creative exercise, this project also helped us forge stronger connections with the stories of Reconstruction-era African Americans—empathy and understanding beyond what a textbook could ever have engendered.

None of this was an accident. Mr. Switzler placed a special emphasis on history being little more than the collected stories of individual people. He taught us to appreciate the value of primary source material and to seek it out whenever possible. Later in the year, he mobilized us—all 100 of us in all his classes—to create a multimedia time capsule of our community. We interviewed long-time citizens and local historians. We photographed historical places and local wildlife. We even spoke to municipal government officials—and their rivals—to gain perspective on local politics. We may not have fully grasped it at the time, but by capturing these stories and moments and recording them all in one place, we were literally making history.
 
 
Robin Hood icon   Seattle Children's Theatre's ROBIN HOOD is bringing the familiar tale of merry men, shifty sherrifs and pompous princes and to life on our stage right now. Don't miss it!
Posted by Zack Ramadan

Our 2014–15 season here at The New Victory has come to a close, and internally we're working hard on getting everything ready for next season, starting with Victory Dance in just a few weeks. At the same time, New York City's school kids will soon be starting their summer vacations. While we wish them all the fun and exploration that a summer of freedom can bring, we hope they remember some of the fun times they had here with us!

This season, 33,377 school kids from 166 schools came to The New Victory for 87 performances. They asked artists 435 burning questions at post-show Talk-Backs and explored each show's themes and art forms in 1,170 pre- and post-show workshops. But most of all, they had a blast—countless laughs, innumerable smiles.

Our New Victory Education Department has compiled some feedback from students, teachers, and teaching artists into a collection we're calling "Moments of Love". As we close out the season and prepare for what's to come, let's look back at the impact we've had over the last year.

QUOTES FROM THE STUDENTS: "I discovered when you take two different things like music or dance from two different places and put them together they can be really beautiful." "How much are tickets? I want to come back, like, 8 or 9 more times!" "That was the best show in history!" "Oh wow! What did I even just see!?" "This was the best day ever!" "When are we coming back?" "That was nuts! That was the best show I've ever seen in my life!"

QUOTES FROM THE TEACHERS: "By working with the New Vic, I learned how to be creative, flexible, and transformative in my approach to teaching children." "Our school is having a talent show this year and you and your Teaching Artists help bring our students out of the their shells." "Most of my students have never been to a live theatrical performance, so the experience of attending a show at The New Victory was a first." "My students loved MINIMON! They thought it was hilarious and 'magical.' They still talk about it today." "We homeschooler have loved you since the beginning! Thank you for everything." "My students learned from seeing CIRQUE ZIVA that if they dedicate themselves to something they love they can become an expert at it." "That is one of our least focused students, and I couldn't believe how this lesson spoke to him. I just learned that he is really rhythmic!" "The New Victory makes me feel like family." "I have never seen my class engaged like this. Not once." "I cry tears of joy at almost every New Vic show. Sharing live performance with kids is that powerful." "My students couldn't believe that these performers came from the same country as them. I think it excited them to feel a connection with the production."

QUOTES FROM THE TEACHING ARTISTS: "One teacher told us that some kids, who don't normally engage, engaged in our workshop." "Students who were mostly non-verbal began to sparkle and glow as they created their costumes." "Before the end of the workshop, a kid grabbed my leg and said, 'I don't want you to go!' I didn't want to either." "Watching the parents dance to the beat of 'Rapper's Delight' while their kids created their raps was amazing! Many of the parents wrote and performed as well. So much love, family-style." "I love everything about Lexington School for the Deaf, including the security guard who stopped by the workshop and did the moonwalk."

The numbers of students, workshops and performances can be overwhelming, and sometimes it's hard to put them in perspective. But these words—these moments of love—make it all clear. I think this is the best way to measure a year, don't you?