Notifications

New Victory Blog

The New Victory Blog is a place to learn more about New York's theater for families and the shows we produce. Find out what we do and what we're passionate about—exploring the arts as a family.

Give yourself a Shakespearean look, play a "Bard Game" with family and friends and put your own twist on some Shakespearean classics in this Family Activity for William Shakespeare's Long Lost First Play (abridged)! For each show in the season, we post a new Family Activity. You can find all of our past Family Activities here on our blog and at Pinterest.com/NewVictory.

Ruff Around the Edges

In this activity, you'll create your very own look inspired by the Bard himself. 

Materials: Coffee filters, stapler, scissors, hole punch, string

Step One: Measure your string so that it comfortably fits around your neck with a little bit of room. 

Step Two: Fold your coffee filter in half and then fold it in half again. 

Making the Ruff

Making the Ruff

Step Three: Staple the side that isn't ruffly, approximately 1.5 inches from the edge.

Making the Ruff

Step Four: Make a hole using your hole punch or scissors on the bottom corner of your filter, below the staple. 

Making the Ruff

Step Five: Cut off the pointy bottom of the folded coffee filter 

Making the Ruff

Step Six: You will repeat steps one to five as many times as it takes to fill the string around your neck with coffee filters. Think of it like making a necklace! Loop all of your folded coffee filters onto your string and tie the string around your neck. Fluff out the ruff, and tada! You're ready to write your next play. You could even wear your new ruff to William Shakespeare's Long Lost First Play (abridged)!

Making the Ruff

Making the Ruff

The Bard Game

This is a game made of mini-Shakespearean challenges that are very similar to games that you already know and love. Get ready to challenge with your family, using your wit and imagination!

Materials: Bard Game Template, game cards, scissors, timer

Step One: Print out the following The Bard Game

Create your own cards for the "Who Am I?" and "How Many Can You Name?" challenges. Fill these in with your own ideas.

Step Two: Learn how to play the game and create your cards.

Game Rules: 
  • This is a two player game. Once completed, the next player can challenge the winner! The youngest player begins the game.
  • The first player moves to the first place and plays the mini challenge indicated on the space.
  • If you win the mini game, you move forward. If you do not win, then you stay to try again during your next turn.
  • The first player to get to the end wins.
Mini Challenge Rules:

Who Am I?
  • Set your timer for 60 seconds.
  • Pick up a card and place it on your forehead (no peeking!)
  • The other player gives you clues about which Shakespearean character is on your card. They're not allowed to rhyme the name or spell it out.
  • If you guess it before the 60 seconds are up, move to the next space!
How Many Can You Name?
  • Set your timer for 60 seconds.
  • Pick a card and read the number and category written on it. Then, list subjects from the category. How many? As many as the card indicates! Imagine that it says "six heroines." You would then list six of Shakespeare's heroines—Beatrice, Hero, Juliet, Portia, Titania and Viola
  • If you can name the amount written on the card, move forward!
Duel!
  • Each player gets a card.
  • Set your timer for 60 seconds and begin the battle. The player whose turn it is goes second in this challenge.
  • Players must explain why and how their character will win a duel with the other, based on creative thinking and the information on the card. 
  • The one with the most believable story is victorious!
  • EXAMPLE: I pull up a Juliet: Poison card. My opponent pulls a Hamlet: Knife card. My opponent argues that Hamlet would win over Juliet, because of his weapon. I will argue that Juliet poisoned him before the duel even began!
Step Three: Challenge your family and friends. 

Say It Like You Meme It
In this activity you will read some quotes from Shakespeare's best known plays and put your own twist on them.

Step One: Pick one of the following Shakespearean quotes

Quote Bank: 

"To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them. To die: to sleep;"
—Hamlet, Hamlet

"This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man."
—Polonius, Hamlet

"Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing."
—Macbeth, Macbeth

"My words fly up, my thoughts remain below:
Words without thoughts never to heaven go."
—King Claudius, Hamlet

"Ay me, for aught that I could ever read,
Could ever hear by tale or history,
The course of true love never did run smooth,
But either it was different in blood—"
—Hermia, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

"Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind."
—Helena, A Midsummer Night's Dream

"One fairer than my love? The all-seeing sun
Ne'er saw her match since first the world begun"
—Romeo, Romeo and Juliet

"Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow."
—Juliet, Romeo and Juliet


Step Two: Move around the word order or add some words of your own to completely change the meaning.

Example:
Real Quote: "Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow." Juliet, Romeo and Juliet
New Quote: "Night, night! Partying is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say night night till it be morrow."

Step Three: Think of a character from any of your favorite books, movies or TV series saying the new quote you just created. Search an image of that character, save it and put into this meme generator with the new quote your created. How much did the quote change now? 

Example
 
 
Long Lost First Play Thumb That's right, the "Bad Boys of Abridgement" are back! Uproarious and rapid-fire, the Reduced Shakespeare Company makes sharp, short comedy in their latest sendup, spinning the Bard's 39 plays into a fast, funny and fictional 40th. Get your tickets today!

 
Posted by Beth Henderson


Though they first met at the National Centre for Circus Arts, the friendship between the creators of Barely Methodical Troupe's Bromance has taken them far beyond the bounds of academia. 

Louis and Charlie first laid eyes on each other during school auditions in 2010. Charlie reminisces, "I still remember Louis' solo piece about the evolution of man—surprisingly conceptual, I thought, for a big guy that does parkour for a circus audition."

 

Charlie Wheeller Charlie Wheeller in the Cyr wheel Photo: Chris Nash
After they were both accepted, Beren joined the team. As soon as Charlie saw him fly, he realized that Beren was a "magical dude." Charlie immediately wanted to train with him. He comments, "There's a great saying, 'Never be the best in the room.' I still always enjoy being onstage with Beren to simply witness the magic."

Beren has equally glowing things to say about "Chiseled Charlie" or "that fresh-faced Justin Beiber lookalike." He loves his energy and "knew from the get-go that deep down we're nearly the same person."

During the journey to his first day of school at the National Centre for Circus Arts, Beren sat directly in front of Louis on the ferry. So, his first impression was, "...why is this huge man following me?" He says, "The rest was history and I'm all the better for meeting him."

When they first began working together, it seemed like an odd pairing. Louis elaborates, "Beren came from a martial arts and tricking background, Charlie from breakdancing and I came from parkour and it was this combination of influences that initially informed our movement style, and still does to this day." 

Beren agrees that that this variety of style helped to fuse their trio, "Myself, Charlie and Louis instantly stuck together because we were different from our classmates, who came from the circus and gymnastics worlds. Not knowing any of the circus jargon, we just threw ourselves around relentlessly until we had some snazzy moves under our belts."

There's a fourth member of the troupe who quickly stepped into Bromance when a shoulder injury sidelined Louis—Arthur Parsons. Dubbed "Endearing Arthur," by Beren, who attributes Arhtur's charm to his infectious positivity. "People gravitate towards him like he has a magnetic force. Everyone wants a dose of that gentlemanly charm."

 

Beren D'Amico and Louis Gift Beren D'Amico balancing on Louis Gift during a hand-to-hand routine Photo: Chris Nash

Though not an original creator, Arthur switches out with Louis for certain performances and has become a central figure to the group. He says, "When I first met the Barely Methodical crew, they immediately seemed like they were old friends I just hadn't met yet. I turned out to be right!"

"There's a moment in the show that perfectly captures the idea of what a 'bromance' means to me. Beren and I look into each other's eyes as he's walking towards me. I'm filled with a feeling of love and warmth—in that moment, I know we're connected and looking out for each other."

Bromance initially started as a brief 30-minute piece, but producer Di Robson brought the "sensei of a director" Eddie Kay in to extend it into a full-length show. "Once we met him, we knew we were in for a fun ride. Eddie's humor was a complete joy and it became clear that comedy needed to become a strong foundation for Bromance to sit on," says Charlie.

Although Beren, Louis and Charlie lead exceptionally unique lives, Bromance has a story that makes it both incredibly personal, yet ultimately universal. Louis explains, "A lot of the situations in Bromance are drawn from our history as friends. However, they're situations that everyone has experienced at least once in their life."

The only question that remains is, "What's next for Barely Methodical Troupe?" Always excited to stretch the limits, Louis shares, "The feeling to stay fresh is less pressure and more ambition. One of the main reasons we do this is because we love pushing our skills and learning new things. We want to stay fresh for ourselves just as much as for our audiences!"

Consider this audience member rapt with excitement to see what new trick is up their sleeves. In the meantime, check out Bromance at The New Victory Theater, spinning on our stage until February 25! 
 
 
Bromance Thumb In Bromance, the astonishing talent of these three mates from London will make a hopeless bromantic out of you. Get your tickets today!

 
Posted by Beth Henderson
 |<  <  4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13  >  >|