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New Victory Blog

The New Victory Blog is a place to learn more about New York's theater for families and the shows we produce. Find out what we do and what we're passionate about—exploring the arts as a family.

The New Victory Theater launched the New Victory Usher Corps the day the theater opened to provide paid employment, job training, academic support, mentorship and an introduction to the performing arts for over 50 young New Yorkers each year. Since then, the program has provided over 400,000 hours of paid employment to over 500 NYC teens from across the city. Find out how the young people in your life can apply to be a part of this award-winning program!

All season long, we'll be featuring young people from our Usher Corps in our New Vic Bills and here on the New Victory Blog. Today we’re talking to third-year usher Daniel Alaimo, who comes from the Bronx.

Who inspires you?
My family and friends. They are the ones that have pushed me to better myself, to become fearless and to never doubt myself.

What's your fondest childhood memory?
Waking up on Saturday mornings to watch Pokémon with my sisters.

What was your favorite story as a kid?
The Amazing Spider-Man comic books were my favorites. They were fun, awesome stories that have also helped me with growing up; they've taught me to be responsible and to help others whenever I can.

What are your favorite subjects in school?
I would say it's a tie between science and history. Science has helped me learn how the universe works, and history has taught me how humans have evolved throughout our existence. 

How would you describe your personal style?
If I'm being honest with myself, my personal style would probably be considered “lazy.” I kind of just wake up, look in my drawers and think, “Meh, good enough.”

What's your favorite place to eat or grab food near the theater?
My favorite place to eat is usually someplace quick and cheap. Also, Dunkin' Donuts. I really like (and often really need) their coffee.

What's your favorite thing to do when you're not at work?
I sometimes take classes and perform at The PIT (The People's Improv Theater). I also play video games and work on my YouTube channel. 

What's your favorite NYC hangout or neighborhood?
I'll go anywhere that seems fun and interesting—there's no one specific place that I like to hang out.

What's the most challenging thing about being an usher?
The most challenging thing would probably be trying to make sure that everyone has a good time.

What's your dream vacation? 
I would love to go on a cross-country road trip.
 
Posted by Zack Ramadan
January 8, 2016

A Sense of Memory


NIE Theatre's Museum of Memories opens this weekend! The innovative and poignant show tells the story of a young man's life, as remembered by his friends and family. Our memories are often tied up with our senses—we hear an old song or smell a familiar fragrance and we're instantly transported to a distant moment. For people with synesthesia, the senses can even trigger one another, so that seeing an image might provoke the sound of music! We've gathered some sense memories from our staff below—do you have any?

Museum of Memories

To this day, if I smell a certain kind of plastic, I immediately think of my troll dolls! Suddenly I'm right back in my room, lying on my tummy, brushing their long long hair and dreaming up scenarios for their busy troll lives. — Rhesa Richards, Assistant to the Executive VP and VP of Operations

The smell of suntan lotion always reminds me of the countless summer days spent at my grandparents' house. And the song "Get On Your Feet" by Gloria Estefan always reminds of me of the family dance parties we had in our living room growing up (and may or may not still have to this day...). — Lauren Hood, Artistic Programming Assistant
 

The combo of cigarette smoke and sofrito (an hispanic mix of herbs and spices used on everything you could possibly eat) sends me right back to being at my abuelita's house as a kid. — Janice Acevedo, Education Programs Associate

I think I have synesthesia. Certain words and names carry with them a visual image or color, and sometimes even a sound! It certainly affects my life and makes me have a gut reaction to words. For instance, when I'm writing letters, I listen to the sounds they make, if that makes sense. If they're melodious, I'll hear trumpets! — Melissa Kalt, Director of Individual Giving

I remember passing a discarded leather chair while walking home in the rain last spring, and a waft of cigar smoke hit me at the same moment. The two smells combined, leather and smoke, and zap! I was back in my grandparents' living room in 1989. On the musical side of things, the song "Rie y Llora" by Celia Cruz transports me back to a springtime of high school senioritis, windows down and salsa blaring. — Zack Ramadan, Digital Content Producer
 

I moved out of my family's house and in with two friends in 1976. We were three poor roommates sharing a three-bedroom apartment in Woodside. We barely had beds to sleep on, but we had a record player and the brand new double album, Songs in the Key of Life, that Stevie Wonder had just put out. We danced to it morning, noon and night. Now lifelong friends, the three of us went to hear Stevie Wonder play Songs in the Key of Life at Madison Square Garden last month. We danced and sang and cried at the wonderful memories that flooded us all. What a joyful, loving and peaceful work it is! — Alice Arias, Controller
 
 
Museum of Memories Icon   Have you ever been struck by a strong sense memory? Let us know in the comments below, or on Twitter! NIE Theatre's Museum of Memories is playing at The Duke on 42nd Street, January 8–17 for everyone ages 13 and up. Check out our Family Activity for some activities and resources to explore before and after seeing the show.
Posted by Zack Ramadan
January 13, 2016

Every Audience the Same


Written by Mary Rose Lloyd, Director of Artistic Programming, and members of the Artistic Programming Department

During the Talk-Back immediately following the opening night performance of our latest show, Museum of Memories, a teenage boy in attendance with his parents shared that one of his classmates had committed suicide last year and he hadn't known quite how to process it. "I haven’t cried for months, until now," he said. "Thank you for that." On their way out, his mother approached our Programming Assistant and added, "Thank you for thinking this was something kids should see."
 
Museum of Memories, NIE Theatre (Photo: Jiří N. Jelínek)
Museum of Memories, NIE Theatre (Photo: Jiří N. Jelínek)

At The New Victory, we've never shied away from embracing complex subject matter in our programming, whether it's dense source material (Wuthering Heights, New Vic 2012; Measure for Measure, New Vic 2014), the ravages of war (Past Half Remembered, New Vic 2008; Brundibar, New Vic 2006), drug addiction (Cranked, New Vic 2009), domestic violence (The Book of Everything, New Vic 2012), adolescent unrest and sexual exploration (Once and for All We're Gonna Tell You Who We Are So Shut Up and Listen, New Vic 2010), racism and sexual abuse (The Bluest Eye, New Vic 2007), bullying and teen violence (The Shape of a Girl, New Vic 2005), or manslaughter (The Stones, New Vic 2006). Try as we might to cordon these subjects off as "for adults only," life, as usual, subverts our attempts. Young people are routinely exposed to life’s challenges, and we do them a disservice when we deny them a forum in which they can reflect and react. 
 
Once and For All We're Going to Tell You Who We Are So Shut Up and Listen, Ontroerend Goed and KOPERGIETERY (Photo: Phile Deprez)
Once and For All We're Going to Tell You Who We Are So Shut Up and Listen,
Ontroerend Goed and KOPERGIETERY (Photo: Phile Deprez)

Theater can inspire and compel children, as well as reveal more navigable paths through their complicated worlds. "Every parent wants his/her child to have a happy, uneventful childhood, but bad things happen to kids, despite our best intentions," playwright Martha King De Silva said in a recent interview with TCG. "Putting plays with these themes on our stages can have powerful outcomes―creating enlightenment and empathy in those children who are among the lucky and reassurance for the unlucky children that they are not alone. How great could it be to draw strength from watching a character battling the same challenges as you and emerging victorious?"
 
The Book of Everything, Belvoir and Kim Carpenter’s Theatre of Image (Photo: Heidrun Lohr)
The Book of Everything, Belvoir and Kim Carpenter’s Theatre of Image (Photo: Heidrun Lohr)

Museum of Memories is about a young man's suicide and the swirl of memories left in his wake that his loved ones must sort through. It's sad, yes, but it's also funny, sweet, and life-affirming. With sophisticated and sensitive storytelling and theatrical flourishes, Museum of Memories doesn't seek to offer answers—it instead offers a much-needed space for questions. It's a show we're proud to present, in a season that also includes The Velveteen Rabbit, which was created for an even younger age range and handles with similar grace the subject of loss.

The companies behind these shows—NIE Theatre (New International Encounter) and Unicorn Theatre—treat their young audiences with a unique respect. In that very same opening night Talk-Back, the Museum of Memories cast revealed that they treat every audience the same, whether it's primarily adult or young, giving the latter audience a vote of confidence in their abilities to process and perceive. Young people, they've found, appreciate this respect and respond in kind.
 
The Velveteen Rabbit, Unicorn Theatre (Photo: Robert Day)
The Velveteen Rabbit, Unicorn Theatre (Photo: Robert Day)

"These themes are, in many societies and cultural contexts, looked upon as taboo," Museum of Memories director and NIE Co-Artistic Director Kjell Moberg writes in his program note. "My aim has been to open up these taboos, and to create a physical and mental space where it's okay to laugh and cry, to be a spectator and participant." This week, Kjell will be leading a workshop on this very subject, Embracing Complex Subject Matter, with a group of NYC-based artists and theater-makers who are part of our New Victory LabWorks community. Prior to Museum of Memories coming to the New Vic, Kjell also shared this Explore video with us, in which he discussed his artistic process and some of the early inspirations for the show.


As we plan future seasons, we look forward to more shows that offer similar opportunities for our audiences, of all ages, to connect deeply with the material on stage and off. Museum of Memories runs one more weekend in The Duke on 42nd Street. There will be post-show Talk-Backs and supplemental support materials available at every performance. We hope you'll join us and share some remembrances of your own.
 
 
Mary Rose Lloyd   Mary Rose Lloyd is the Director of Artistic Programming at The New Victory Theater, curating each New Victory season as well as the Victory Dance summer series, and overseeing LabWorks, the New Victory's new work development program. A staff member since 1996, Mary spends much of her time traveling to see hundreds of shows each year and to attend conferences and festivals as a frequent speaker, panelist or juror. She has served on the Boards of Directors for both TYA/USA and International Performing Arts for Youth (IPAY) and is the recipient of IPAY's Mickey Miners Lifetime Achievement Award. She is passionate about books, family, friends and, most certainly, the performing arts.
Posted by Zack Ramadan

The New Victory Theater launched the New Victory Usher Corps the day the theater opened to provide paid employment, job training, academic support, mentorship and an introduction to the performing arts for over 50 young New Yorkers each year. Since then, the program has provided over 400,000 hours of paid employment to over 500 NYC teens from across the city. Find out how the young people in your life can apply to be a part of this award-winning program!

All season long, we'll be featuring young people from our Usher Corps in our New Vic Bills and here on the New Victory Blog. Today we’re talking to third-year usher Chelsea Guzman, who calls Brooklyn home.

Who inspires you?

Chelsea prepares for take-off in a rocketship made of New Vic booster seats!

I inspire myself! I don't mean for that to sound conceited—I believe in always being proud of my accomplishments. It's hard for many people to acknowledge how amazing they are, and I don't want to be like that.

What's your fondest childhood memory?
The day I learned to love books. As a kid I didn't enjoy reading, but I remember the day that my first grade teacher started reading us a Junie B. Jones book by Barbara Park, and after that day I completely fell in love with those books. It was the storylines that intrigued me, and how realistic and relatable the books were to me at that age. No one could get me away from books after that!

What are your favorite subjects in school?
My two favorite subjects are English and Math. As much as I love reading, I also love to write. Describing my life as if it were a book is a natural instinct to me. I actually didn't enjoy Math before high school, but once I began to understand the subject, it became really fun.

How would you describe your personal style?
I would say my personal style consists of a bit of everything. What I wear depends on the occasion, or on how I'm feeling that day. Lipstick, however, is never missing from my bag!

What's your favorite place to eat or grab food near the theater?
I always bring my own food—my mom's cooking is my favorite. The only thing I really do enjoy nearby are Crumbs' muffins, just a few doors down!

What's your favorite thing to do when you're not at work?
I like to go to the gym occasionally, or sit somewhere like Central Park to read a book.

What's your favorite NYC hangout or neighborhood?
Central Park is so beautiful and the perfect place to hang out. Greenwich Village is perhaps my favorite neighborhood, though, simply because it's one of Manhattan's calmer areas.

What's the most challenging thing about being an usher?
Sometimes it's hard to balance home life and school work with work at the theater. It can be hard to come in with a lot of energy. It gets easier, though, once I realize how excited families are to be here.

What's your dream job? 
I'm not sure. I have nothing concrete in mind, but being an OB/GYN sounds cool!

What's your dream vacation?
Ever since I came back from Disneyland, I've dreamt of going back! Therefore, two weeks in Disneyland and a trip to Universal Studios again would be the best thing ever.
 
Posted by Zack Ramadan
"You must be very kind to him and teach him all he needs to know in Rabbit-land, for he is going to live with you for ever and ever!" — The Nursery Magic Fairy
 
 
Written by Margery Williams in 1922 and first illustrated by William Nicholson, The Velveteen Rabbit is a beloved and poignant classic. The National Education Association includes it on their teacher-compiled list of top books for kids, and our friends at Brightly dubbed the titular bunny one of the most lovable characters in all of kids' lit. (Though how could they not? The whole story turns on his lovability!)

The Velveteen Rabbit has been adapted many times in its 94 years. The latest interpretation, of course, in a season full of artful adaptations, is Unicorn Theatre's theatrical one, on the New Victory stage through the end of January. 
 

Before you come to see the performance, consider reading (or re-reading) the book as a family. Familiarity with the story can't hurt, as it does explore themes of loss and illness; and having it fresh in your minds will help you appreciate Unicorn's adaptation all the more—it really is wonderful! To help you get in a Velveteen mood, we've embedded the original illustrated version below, compiled by Free Kids Books. You can also download a PDF, visit your local NYPL branch or order a hard copy of the book—there are many editions.
 
If you know the story well, or if your family falls in love with it after seeing it onstage at the New Vic, then there are many more adaptations out there. Take a look at some video previews below:
 

Award-winning short film by Leonard Berman (1973), available on DVD.


Grammy-nominated storybook narrated by Meryl Streep (1985), available for download and streaming.

Enchanted Musical Playhouse version starring Marie Osmond (1984), available on VHS


Animated version narrated by Christopher Plummer (1985), available on DVD.
 
Do you have a favorite edition or adaptation of The Velveteen Rabbit? Let us know in the comments below, or with #TheVelveteenRabbit on Twitter and Instagram.
Posted by Zack Ramadan